The results of the 2011 Census continue to be published, giving more insights into contemporary British life. Some of these insights are of general, academic interest, but other data has immediate practical value for many businesses and non-commercial organisation. Recently-released 2011 Census data on social grade in England & Wales is both interesting and useful. We have used just a little of this information to make our social grade ABC1 map of England & Wales.

Social Grade ABC1 Map

Social Grade ABC1 Map

 

The recent BBC survey on British social class put a more nuanced, modern spin on our traditional view of the class system. Geodemographic classifications go even further, splitting local areas into many categories based on the type of people who live there. Important business tasks like store location planning, targeted marketing, or defining sales and franchise territories all benefit from data on where different social groups live. The 2011 Census provides a wealth of such data, notably approximated social grade.

 

Social grade is a socio-economic classification that puts people into classes A to E based mainly on their occupation. It is used by market research industries to analyse spending habits and consumer attitudes. The social grade ABC1 map shows the famous ABC1 group, consisting people in managerial, administrative and professional occupations, rather than manual occupations and unemployment. It relates to historic distinctions between office jobs and manual work, between traditional manufacturing industries and the service sector, and even between working class and middle class areas.

 

The social grade ABC1 map shows the proportion of household reference persons aged 16-64 who are classed as ABC1 in each local authority in England & Wales. The 2011 Census data on approximated social grade can be mapped for each social grade and for much smaller areas too. This might be very useful for particular types of business. For example, some services can be most effectively located or promoted in neighbourhoods dominated by ABs (higher and intermediate managerial, administrative, professional occupations), and others will do better in areas with plenty of C2s (skilled manual occupations).